Contact

If you would like to contact me directly concerning a post, story idea, or a lead please feel free to do so at the email address below:

Aviationintel@gmail.com

I absolutely love hearing from my readers. Your participation makes this site better via the sharing of informed comments, interesting links and story leads. With your valued readership and assistance, it is my plan to make aviationintel.com the place to go for people who want in-depth coverage of what are often times very complicated subjects and stories. I have found that the mainstream media, including some major defense and aviation outlets, do a good job of summing up a subject or story in a succinct and efficient matter, but often times the details and the full explanations of not just what is but why it is becomes lost in such abbreviated journalism. Consequently, I believe that many intelligent and curious minds are left wanting more than what they are given from these major sources. This is precisely why I built aviationintel.com. I have literally spent my whole life studying the aviation and defense universe and I find it an exciting challenge to convey my knowledge and opinions to my readers in an easy to understand, conceptual manner. I hope you enjoy the site and please feel free to contact me any time.

-Ty

13 Responses to Contact

  1. Richard Briscoe says:

    I found the video and comments about the Global Hawk mishap (unrecoverable spin) interesting, but it posed an entirely different question to me, that of the stall characteristics of the RQ-170. As you will recall, the YB-49, also a “flying wing” design departed controlled flight during testing resulting in the loss of the aircrew, including Captain Glenn Edwards, after whom Muroc AFB was renamed Edwards AFB. Eye witness testimony described the aircraft as tumbling. The investigation discovered that there had been partial structural failure prior to impact with the ground.

    Then Major Bob Cardenas who flew the YB-49 in tests prior to the mishap has stated in interviews included in various TV documentaries that he has warned Edwards of problems with the flight characteristics of the YB-49 in approach to stall test he performed. He further speculated that the aircraft tumbled and G forces prevented the aircrew from taking further action.

    For these reasons I wonder if the RQ-170 would enter a conventional spin or flat spin. Let me make it very clear that I have no knowledge of the RQ-170′s flight or other characteristics, but I have questions about the possibility of a spin scenario based upon prior “flying wing” mishaps. That said, The B-2 design team most certainly must have investigated this matter before proceeding with production of it.

    Anyway, I thought you might be in a position to further explore this through your sources.

    Thanks for the interesting coverage of these aviation matters.

    Regards,

    Richard

    • aviationintel.com says:

      Richard, great insight here. I was thinking the same thing, remember the YB-49 and it’s earlier predecessors and their terrible stall and yaw issues. I do have t say that although similar in form there are some large possible differences, one is wing loading, another is Fly By Wire controls that make our modern flying wings usable at all. Even if the aircraft departed from controlled flight, it does not mean the FBW system did not “give up” and attempt to maintain some control. Big difference here, we simply do not know what the aerdynamic realities are of a RQ-170. We saw the very similar shaped B-2 stall taking off from guam, it sliced to the left but that was a comparativley short fall in thick air. The flat spin is just one of man theories here. Take these posts as just that, presentation of possibilities.

      Thanks so much for your comments!

      Ty

  2. Dave Jewitt says:

    Best aviation site on the web

  3. Ryan Lunde says:

    Tyler,

    Just a quick note regarding the Enterprise’s new home in New York. I couldn’t agree more with you. That musesum seems like such a haphazard collection that will be a dreadful place for a historic craft like Enterprise. The once great ship that now hosts all of New York’s old airplanes is the USS Intrepid, rather than the Midway as you state. From all accounts, the Midway in San Diego is a far superior museum to the Intrepid and focuses on carrier aviation rather than any sundry air-or-space artifact that may arrive to end its days corroding on the Hudson. I would have left a comment, but there was no provision for that on your write-up.

    Also, with all of this Shuttle shuttling, do you have any idea how the shuttle tailcones which are placed over the main engines are moved when they’re not on a shuttle? They seem to enormous to fit into anything but a C-5 and obviously they have had to be moved back and forth across the country after transporting a shuttle. Photos show Enterprise and Discovery nose-to-nose in DC, both wearing a tailcone fairing. Any idea how they’ll get one back to Florida to put it on Endeavor?

    Regards,

    -Ryan

    • aviationintel.com says:

      Ryan, thanks so much for your comments! I wrote that so late at night, thanks for the correction, I am surprised nobody else has emailed me about it!!

      Yeah those cones are massive. Fairly certain they are transported around by NASA’s supper guppy that hauls around other outsized cargo. The Guppy will be bringing the Shuttle trainer to Seattle as well. Lots of room in that bulge!

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aero_Spacelines_Super_Guppy

  4. Isaac Alexander says:

    Great website! Any plans to start using Twitter to promote your aviation passion? I saw someone already set up a Twitter handle @aviationintel You could set up @aviation_intel instead.

  5. aviationintel.com says:

    Isaac, thanks so much for the kind words man. Yes, twitter feed should be up and running next week I think.

  6. Lurker says:

    I assume you have seen this, it gives high level rundown of 2013 budget appropriations (not “authorization” yet but “appropriation” gives sense of what is being requested) including many aviation budget lines: http://www.dtic.mil/congressional_budget/

  7. Paul Peters says:

    What a great piece on your thoughts on the Iran F 313. I’m a recent viewer of your site but always find it interesting and insightful. Keep up the excellent work.

  8. trev says:

    i saw the rq170 fly real slow over my house last yr at 2am 3 weeks before it was captured by iran,,,at first,i thought it was a ufo,like aliens,,,,then after it was caught by iran ,i knew that was real,it was the same thing i saw.i was living in Nevada at the time,GARDNERVILLE nv to be exact,,1327 tolar,,,is there anyway to get flight recordsof this thing during that date period,,,prob not but would be interesting to see why,it was flying over my house,and as soon as i reconized it was somthing,it flew off with super speed poof!i litterally heard poof,,,,,,,,then it was gone. ????? why was this in my neiborhood…ps i only wish i was filming,,,dammm

  9. David says:

    Last post was May 23rd. That’s over 3 weeks ago. Got something big brewing, hit some tech snags or just burning out? Or none of the above?

  10. Jeff Krob says:

    Hey – I know this is an aviation blog but you sometimes include some Navy stories.

    History is being made – the USS Long Beach is (finally) being scrapped at PSNY.

    Google Earth: 47° 33.546′, -122° 37.843′

    Govt. Liquidation Contract: http://www.govliquidation.com/auction/view?id=5401919&convertTo=USD

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>